Monday, August 21, 2017

MMPR (Malaysia Association for Mindfulness Practice and Research)

MMPR (Malaysia Association for Mindfulness Practice and Research) is the only organisation in Malaysia which offers meditative programmes to all age groups. 3nity developed its brand identity to reflect the core of the MMPR.

The logotype is self-explanatory with the organisation’s initials, and the two parallel lines represent the eyes of a person. The main logotype is the “still” expression of someone in mindful meditation. The different combinations of parallel lines indicate the different emotions during meditation. The logotype is sometimes placed together with a peaceful image of the horizon to convey the 
essence of mindfulness.




Friday, May 26, 2017

The ABC (A Book & Chocolate) learning space project

In Milache village, off the trail towards the Annapurna base camp of Nepal, a group of friends have come together to set up a learning space with the local communities to encourage literacy among their children. 

The ABC idea was sparked by one trekker’s experience of being constantly asked for chocolates by the children. Concerned for their future, he and his friends hope to transform the young lives belonging to the lowest caste by inspiring them to value knowledge and develop a reading habit. Thus, a learning space has been set-up, where children will get their well-deserved treats when they read and learn. 

The Book
“My ABC in Annapurna” is a children’s book created to aid the teaching of basic English skills. It’s designed to be relevant to the everyday lives of the children in Milache – what they see, experience and come in contact with on a daily basis. 

The Styling
The book is presented with lively colours, forms and textural effects to attract the children’s eyes. The uniqueness of this book’s concept lies in the formation of the sentences by using the first letter of the 26 alphabets. Visually, each letter is also fused with the graphic representation itself.

The ABC (A Book & Chocolate) learning space project

In Milache village, off the trail towards the Annapurna base camp of Nepal, a group of friends have come together to set up a learning space with the local communities to encourage literacy among their children.

The ABC idea was sparked by one trekker’s experience of being constantly asked for chocolates by the children. Concerned for their future, he and his friends hope to transform the young lives belonging to the lowest caste by inspiring them to value knowledge and develop a reading habit. Thus, a learning space has been set-up, where children will get their well-deserved treats when they read and learn.

Annually, 70,000 trekkers pass by the region, which lends sustainability to the project. Although ABC will periodically depend on their goodwill in the donation of books, chocolates and even a little time; local volunteers and the community will actively participate in and manage the learning space. This concept creates an exciting educational opportunity for children and local volunteers alike as more tools will be curated as the need arises to make the space alive and relevant to the community.

By air, on road, off road, by foot. Our journey to the ABC learning space at Milache village, Nepal.


Painting the fa├žade.

For more videos and updates, please visit: www.fb.me/abookandchocolate

A Book / Chocolate, please? You may leave your chocolates or books at the ABC learning space. The children will also be delighted to learn English or any other skills from you. It takes more than a village to raise a child, so we hope that your giving will help them to build character. Dhanyabad!







Friday, May 12, 2017

UNDI Campaign

This is an awareness campaign focused on the younger generation to register and vote for their country during the upcoming election. The empty box is a space for people to voice out their opinions and reason why they want to vote for Malaysia. They can also use different U typefaces to represent themselves in their own unique way.



Friday, April 28, 2017

Paper, for life

A tree gives life to paper and the latter gives life to ideas. A clean sheet of paper is like tabula rasa, the blank slate that is ready for any creative possibility. At the same time, the nature of paper is like a human being. It has different characteristics, textures, colours, smells, temperament, weight, and it ages. Choosing the right paper for a project by observing and knowing paper’s different natures can make the difference between a good and an exquisite job.

Yet, paper is not limited to print as it pushes the boundary across different disciplines: art, architecture, product and fashion. Paper may seem fragile yet it can be strong at the same time. Inspiring examples have been demonstrated by Shigeru Ban, a Japanese architect known for innovative heavy-duty paperwork, who has quickly and efficiently housed disaster victims with recycled cardboard tubes. In 1995, Ban built a temporary church after the Kobe Earthquake, which is still in use.

Despite our reliance on the digital medium, paper is still very much alive; it engages our senses in a way that the digital medium never could. The paper master, Li Hongbo, emphasizes that fact with his sensuous paper sculptures in motion. Today, we are finding ourselves being more appreciative of paper as a beautiful and versatile material for us to explore our creativity. With the emergence of even a wider range of materials, paper is here to stay.


The visionary starts with a clean sheet of paper and reimagines the world. – Malcolm Gladwell

A poster that was aged by the tropical sun and torrential rain.


Less is more

When plain paper is crafted in a simple way, stacked and juxtapositioned in a play of light and shadow, the results can surprisingly look like art.









Paper's experience
Paper, like a person, acquires interesting characteristics after undergoing extreme experiences. After being neglected under the sun and rain, angrily crumpled or carelessly burnt and stomped upon; new textures and marks give it a look like no other. These are akin to scars that tell a story.

Paper’s age
The stains, smell and fragility that reveal themselves as paper ages give it a nostalgic character.



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